Category: News

Should You Disclose Your Depression in the Workplace?

There’s a very provocative article in CNN.Health today. If you are depressed (or have some other mental-health condition), should you reveal this at work? And if you decide to make this revelation, to whom should you share? In 1972, Thomas Eagleton’s revelation of his history of depression cost him the nomination for the Vice Presidency. […]

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Mental Health on Broadway

Next to Normal is the bravest and one of the most talked-about Broadway musicals in years. It is recently the subject of an American Theatre Wing “Working in the Theatre” seminar. We highly recommend this landmark musical as a way, along with the efforts of AMHF, to raise public awareness about bipolar disorder and other […]

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Are Children with Emotional Issues Overmedicated?

The New York Times weighs in with a thoughtful article on more than a child-rearing question: Are we doing right by the next generation when early signs of emotional distress are expressed? This is an issue of national concern. Even though AMHF is concentrating its efforts more toward “the other end” of the population spectrum, […]

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Death by Mind Control? Part 2

Readers of our blog know I draw inspiration from the

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Celebrating the Nineteenth Amendment

On the AMERICA online magazine, here is an interesting profile of one of our upcoming authors: “Ninety years ago this week Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women a right to vote that should have been inalienable. This week, Joanne Gavin continues apace in coauthoring her third book, Live Your […]

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Death by Mind Control?

A fascinating case was tried in 1993 in the state of Connecticut involving an est session, an est trainer named David Norris (among others on the scene), and the death of an est participant. How much stress is too much? How much of our own lives, including one’s own death (excepting by suicide), could be […]

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More on the Bullying Epidemic

Joanna Weiss has a slightly different take on bullying as she analyzes the trial of six young women. They are accused of bullying another adolescent so brutally as to cause her to hang herself. The entire article is worth reading. See Article on Bullying by Joanna Weiss in the Boston Globe

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7 Ways to Get Better Sleep

We all know unhealthy ways to get to sleep, but how aware are we of small habits and behaviors that reap a big reward when it comes to getting a good night’s sleep. Sleep studies have become an important medical field in both psychology and medicine and are discovering and organizing behavioral principles that promote […]

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Brain Trauma Can Mimic A.L.S.

The New York Times reports on new medical research suggesting that repeated concussions and other brain trauma might be responsible for the constellations that are called “Lou Gehrig’s Disease.” The article points out that Lou Gehrig probably suffered more head injuries and concussions than realized when one takes into account his career as a football […]

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President Obama Proposes Care for Veterans

Karen Smith, writing in AMERICA, reports on President Obama’s talk at the beginning of the month in Atlanta, Georgia at the convention of the Disabled Veterans of America. After World War II, the country had built an impressive system of health care for Veteran’s. They had excellent clinical psychology training opportunities available for clinical psychology. […]

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Preventing Violence through Church Involvement

AMHF has taken a special interest in the prevention of violence and in the many forms that coercion and abuse make themselves known. Recently we have been examining the extent of bullying in society and across the lifespan, a task that we suspect is only beginning. Errol Louis, columnist for the New York Daily News, […]

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The Tragedy of Bipolar Disorder

Football star and bipolar disorder.

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Publishing Erich Fromm

In founding AMHF Books, the book-publishing arm of The American Mental Health Foundation, I along with our board sought two things. (1) To disseminate our knowledge in a way that also would preserve the lifework of the late Stefan de Schill. This would include books written in the spirit of Dr. de Schill’s work but […]

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More on the Epidemic of Bullying from the Times

New York Times continues on the subject of Bullying through the Life Cycle.

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Dr. Norman Reed Joins Professional Advisory Board

Dr. Norman Reed, a clinical psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of violent children and adolescents, has joined our Professional Advisory Board. For nearly 30 years he has worked in various programs for these youngsters in the State of Oregon. Welcome, Dr. Reed!

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Low Income Rural Women and Spirituality

An intriguing article is presented in the current issue of the Journal of Counseling and Development, the academic journal of the American Counseling Association. The authors (Gill, Minton, and Myers) that a woman’s spirituality or religious commitment accounted for a good portion of their resilience and wellness. There are implications for training programs in psychology, […]

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Janice E. Johnson joins Professional Advisory Board

We are happy to announce that Janice E. Johnson has joined our Professional Advisory Board. Ms. Johnson worked for many years in the public sector in California, working with many children and women who were being abused. She is Phi Beta Kappa and her graduate degree is from the University of Minnesota. We are happy […]

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Bullying Across the Lifespan

As experts and the public ask for and learn more and more about bullying, not only is its presence in schools better known, but one begins to wonder about all the other situations across the lifespan where bullying occurs. Some possibilities: *Siblings bullying each other *Parents bullying teachers *Cliques that bully other cliques *Boys that […]

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Jungian Play Therapy

Eric J. Green writes about Jungian Play therapy in his article Traversing the heroic journey,” which appeared in the March 2010 issue of Counseling Today, published by the American Counseling Association Here are some of his ideas: “One of our primary tasks as child counselors is to provide an emotionally safe and protective space within […]

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Cyberbullying

Bullying online from the New York Times

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Violence against Women

American Mental Health Foundation published its first book, featuring state-of-the-art research, on The Violent Person. Today’s New York Times reviews a book of especial interest on violence as visited upon women, specifically one woman who is an expert herself in the field, and the shameful stigma of silence associated with it. The book is called […]

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A Controversial Approach to Eating Disorders

A different approach to the treatment of eating disorders–one combining elements of behavior therapy, flooding, and family therapy has become known as the Maudsley Approach. Rather than using psychological therapies and medication, this approach uses the family as the core element of treatment. What occurs is that the entire family makes a commitment to live/eat […]

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More on the Epidemic of Bullying

Bullying in the New York Times.

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AMHF Announces Beginning of Professional Advisory Board

To help provide us with a range of ideas and resources, AMHF is making the first two appointments to its Professional Advisory Board. This group of professionals will offer ideas and advice to AMHF regarding ways to implement the mission. This will help to five us a further diversity of viewpoints. The first two members […]

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Happy Birthday Jack Fowler!

All of us at AMHF wish Jack Fowler, our treasurer, the happiest of birthdays on June 18! Thank you, Jack, for all you do for us and so many others.

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Insurers Balk on Insuring 19-26 group

We have noted previously that a number of insurance companies have found ways to minimize costs of serious and lifelong mental health problems that are covered under the Mental Health Parity Act. A similar dragging of feet seems to be occurring with providing health care (which includes mental health services) to 19-26 year olds. The […]

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Glenn Close to Address Neuroscience 2010 Convention

Glenn Close, award-winning actress who has become an advocate for persons with bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses, will be the Keynote Speaker at Neuroscience 2010 , the 40th Annual Meeting of the Society of Neuroscience, to be held in San Diego from November 13-17th, 2010. Close has developed a special interest in mental […]

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Mandated Treatment Law Set to Expire

Kendra’s Law, passed by the New York State legislature about ten years ago, is set to expire. This law was passed and named after a woman who was pushed to her death by a severely mentally ill person who was not following the prescribed treatment regimen. One of the advocates of this bill is E. […]

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Firms Fight Practice of Mental Health Parity

The 2008 Law concerning parity for mental health treatment–making mental health care covered by insurance to be on a level with medical care–apparently is being circumvented by some businesses, the Boston Globe reported today. Therapists, previously required to only fax in treatment information, now are reported to participate in lengthy and sometimes intimidating phone interviews. […]

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The Sports Wound and Bullying

Many of the public and well as the mental health professions have never heard of the phrase “sports wound.” This refers to males who do not display athletic prowess or good eye-hand coordination. As much as we may want to deny this, boys who lack sports ability often are teased and bullied through their growing […]

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