Category: Mental Health Training

Counseling out of the Office/Homeless Clients

Sandy Sheller, coordinator of the Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia, tells of a client who wouldn’t go for treatment at a drug-treatment center. Her case worker simply labeled her as resistant and noncompliant, and closed the case. When Sheller worked with this client, she asked in s caring manner why it was that the client […]

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Trouble Getting to Sleep?

Sleep is essential according to the American Psychological Association. This professional group notes that “millions of people don’t get enough, resulting in such problems as daytime sleepiness, poor decision-making, interference with learning, and accidents.” One study, using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), suggested that CBT can do a better job of reducing anxiety than sleeping pills. […]

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5-star Endorsement of Dr. Raymond B. Flannery Jr., The Violent Person

“The Violent Person is a masterpiece. It is must reading for anyone in risk management or hospital administration. Dr. Flannery is without question the leading authority on the violent patient. His insights and recommendations on the management of this increasing challenge in health care are not only welcomed, but essential as the face of American […]

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Book on Cognitive Therapy Wins British Medical Society Book Award

Many therapies focus on identifying and resolving feelings and conflicts. Empathy–truly understanding another’s life situation–is a common characteristic of all successful therapists. Beginning in the 1970s, Albert Ellis and Aaron Beck developed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) which emphasizes identifying dysfunctional thoughts, changing them to transform negative feelings such as depression and anxiety into positive mental […]

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Tax Dollars at Work

The National Institute of Mental Health offers a rich Web site for consumers, researchers, and program administrators. Not only is there detailed and highly credible information about major mental-health conditions, the procedures for obtaining research and program grants are detailed. A section of the Web site, “Science News,” provides interesting feature stories about conditions and […]

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Rave Review of The Violent Person by Dr. Raymond B. Flannery Jr.

The Midwest Book Service gives a 5-Star review to The Violent Person the first book issued by the American Mental Health Foundation. See this review on amazon by clicking below. amazon

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A Jungian Poem by Leah Jimenez

The author is a writer and student of Jungian psychology, who hopes one day to take up temporary residence in Zurich , and to become immersed and absorbed into the rich Jungian tradition, one still alive on the continent. Visit to the Psychoanalyst by Leah Jimenez Who are you? I am Death? Death? Yes, Death. […]

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In Appreciation of Eugene Kennedy

For half-a-century, Dr. Eugene Kennedy’s books have brought complex mental-health issues to the general public. His classic On Becoming A Counselor (now coauthored with his wife, Dr. Sara Charles) has sold 250,000 copies, has been continuously revised to reflect new findings, and is in print after nearly 35 years at this writing. This book teaches […]

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Mental Health: Where Do Your Politicians Stand?

There are some political topics and issues that one party or another seems to own. These concerns are part of the history and ideology of a particular political party and they present themselves, sometimes in slightly or radically different forms, as the years go by and the elections occur every two to four years. From […]

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A Powerful Grass-Roots Organization

There is a nation-wide organization offering support and help to those with psychological problems and their families. In these days of funding changes, there is a section devoted to the legislative environment for those who want to become public advocates. The National Association of Mental Health website is a valuable resource for everyone: National Association […]

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A New York (Therapy) Minute

Many are accustomed to viewing therapy as a process that occurs in chunks of 30, 45, or 60 minutes. Yes, much healing occurs this way. Others remind us that therapy can occur in short intervals: the school psychologist briefly talking to a student, the psychologist stopping by at someone’s bedside in a hospital, the quick […]

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Fort Hood and the Violent Person

The tragic violence at Fort Hood first kept a nation in suspense, then brought the nation to high levels of powerful emotions, and now has our country looking back to find answers. Why did this happen? What were telltale signs that might have been missed? Can we learn something from this mass shooting to prevent […]

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Therapists, Therapies, or Both?

When I was learning fly casting a number of years ago, I turned to a number of experts to teach me. Throughout small successes in getting the heavy and whiplike line to carry the tiny artificial fly toward the fish were many, many failures through which the line wrapped around me or became entangled in […]

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“Happy Days: Kierkegaard or the Couch?”

In today’s New York Times, Gordon Marino raises tantalizing and taboo questions in his essay “Kierkegaard on the Couch”: Kierkegaard on the Couch Many of us mental health professionals are quick to see any despair that is made up of themes related to spiritual sadness as indicators of depression, small or major. Freud of course […]

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Reflections on foundations and forgotten children

As Evander Lomke mentions on this blog and in the accompanying video, AMHF gave the first Stefan de Schill Award to Astor Services for Children last week. The generosity of the Gould Foundation meant that this presentation could occur in the financial district of New York City. Interestingly, the New York Stock Exchange stood solidly […]

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American Psychological Association (AAP) Convention 2009

I am recently back from attending the annual American Psychological Association, the major organization of practicing and research psychologists in North America. With 150,000 members, the venerable APA convened for the 117th time in Toronto. Over 10,000 members, representing major universities and clinical programs, attended, as well as many psychologists who are in private practice. […]

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I HATE YOU! DON’T LEAVE ME! Borderline Personality Disorder

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a cross to bear for all who are within its range, including spouses, other immediate family, friends, and perhaps the sufferer of this condition most of all. Before 1980, this was not a recognized psychiatric term. But it was added in the Third Edition of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual […]

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Hagiophobia: Defined but How Prevalent?

One of the goals of the American Mental Health Foundation is to encourage exploration between religion and mental health, particularly in finding religious practices that enhance mental health. We always hope to do so in a nondenominational way. Hagios comes from the Greek word meaning “sacred” or “holy.” Hagiophobia therefore means fear of God, saints, […]

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Some Things I Have Learned about Autism

By Dr. William Van Ornum When I was a psychology graduate student at Loyola University of Chicago, my introduction to autism involved observing and learning about a nine-year-old girl who constantly banged her head against hard objects, to the point of bleeding and perhaps even concussion. The saddest part was seeing that nothing seemed to […]

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My Summer with William James

Summer is a great time to catch up on all of those novels, mysteries, and thrillers that have piled up over the year. Sometimes it can be a time to reacquaint oneself with favorite authors from the past, read long ago while in school, knowing that a rereading can bring out many more themes. One […]

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New Approach to OCD

Mention OCD and you bring up strong feelings in any person or family member that suffers from it. Strange and frightening thoughts that intrude and don’t go away, meaningless gestures and actions that someone is compelled to perform, over and over, fully aware that these behaviors are at best silly and at their worst thieves […]

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Did You Know ? . . . SAT and Mental Health

The American Mental Health Foundation takes no official position on the SAT. We do, however, recognize the tremendous anxiety it engenders. As in many areas related to mental health, knowing something about the history gives us greater awareness of how current practices developed. You will see how this bit of history offers a lesson to […]

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The Roots of Conicidence and the Frontiers of the Mind

What or where are the boundaries of psychology and parapsychology? Are those that ridicule research into ESP, telepathy, precognition, and clairvoyance acting as responsible skeptics? Or are they closed-minded? When it comes to the human mind, it may be always be best to keep an open mind. In 1972, a slim book by Arthur Koestler […]

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Genetic Research and Mental Health

The New York Times recently reported on cutting-edge research with direct implications for mental health. Genetic researchers discovered a variety of gene mutations in the genes affecting the enzymes produced by the liver: chemicals that are the first step in changing psychiatric drugs into other chemicals that can then influence the brain. (The variety of […]

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Our New Video

Under the auspices of LanternMedia, the American Mental Health Foundation has produced a short video about its history and program. You may watch it below:

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American Psychological Association

The American Psychological Association, a group of over 100,000 psychologists in the U.S.A., offers helpful information for professionals as well as the public on its website: click here for APA link

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DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION

I have been reading a wonderful book, DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder from Childhood through Adulthood by Edward M. Hallowell, M.D., and John Ratey. M.D. This book brings to a general trade audience wisdom gained from peer-reviewed studies and research. Unlike some books on this topic, there is no ax […]

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PSYCHODYNAMIC DIAGNOSTIC MANUAL: Helpful companion the DSM IV

In the latter part of the 20th century a dramatic shift occurred regarding the manner in which psychiatrists and other mental health professionals described and diagnosed psychological problems. DSM I, the first version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, was a modest size paperback handbook providing broad categories of mental health problems. It was the […]

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Licensure as Psychoanalyst in New York State

Several years ago New York State added new mental health positions that are licensable in New York State. Among these were licenses in psychoanalysis, mental health counseling, and marriage and family counseling. All of these require the minimum of a master’s degree and certain kinds of supervised experience. Previously the major licensed/certified positions were for […]

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